+977 9851 029 613  Nepal
+46 70 420 39 23  Sweden
info@nepalguidetreks.com

Shisapangma Expedition

Shisapangma Expedition

Overview

A straightforward climb and not technically demanding, an excellent mountain for climbers wanting to scale their first 8,000m peak with out taking much risk.

Mt Shisapangma 8012m was first climbed by H. Ching and Nine Climbers in 1664. it's located in central Himalaya and lies totally inside the Tibet. To the east lies Mt Molamenchen, west Mt Xifeng and Mt Nandengri and to the northwest Mt Kangbochen.

Mt Shishapabgma, "the range above the grassy plain" was first climbed by the Chinese in 1964.

There are three distinct climbing routes on the Southwest face with several other logical possibilities on the West Ridge and East face.

Our itinerary that begin by driving into Tibet through Kordari, crossing the himalaya through gorges of Bhote Koshi. The drive is simply awesome!! and full of excitement, we'll arrive on the other side of Himalaya from Kathmandu to Nayalam on first day. We'll spend our nights in Nayalam relaxing and hiking the hills for acclimatizing.

From Nayalam, we begin our overland travel to Chinese base camp. After arrival at Chinese Base Camp, we'll rest, acclimatize and make the necessary climb preparations before making our ascent to advanced base camp. The given cost covers services only upto ABC therefore to attempt the summit, you must do necessary preparation by yourself. you cross through steep moraines to establish Camp 1 (6730m), which should take around 4 - 6 hours depending on weather conditions and how you are feeling. Traverse a ridge and ascend a 50m headwall to Camp 2 (7045m) - a hard day taking 6 - 7 hours. you can establish Camp 3 (7400m) on the southwest face, and the following day, set up for the summit. Depending on fitness, you must be moving up and down the mountain several times, acclimatizing and stocking the higher camps.

It will require an extra push to reach the true summit peak on the far end of the high snowfield. Summit day, though long and arduous, will be well worth it when the highest peaks in the world are in view. 

Outline Itinerary

Day 01: Arrival Kathmandu (1,340m).
Day 02:
Necessary expedition preparations 
Day 03:
Drive to Kodari; cross border & continue drive to Nayalam 
Day 04:
In Nayalam (3400m), acclimatization 
Day 05 - 06:
Rest a day for acclimatization 
Day 07 - 09:
Drive to Chinese base camp (4,800m); rest and acclimatization 
Day 10 - 12: Trek to Advanced Base Camp (5,700m) 
Day 13 - 35:
Climbing period to summit Shishapangma, Camp 1, Camp 2, Camp 3, Summit 
Day 36:
Trek from ABC to Chinese BC 
Day 37:
Drive to Nayalam 
Day 38:
Cross border & drive to Kathmandu 
Day 39:
Free day & evening celebration meal 
Day 40:
International departures to home

Note: The above itinerary outline can be easily tailor-made according to your preference, purpose of visit, and length of stay.  Contact us to customize this trip as per your requirement 

Additional Information

Footwear:

Running shoes: For travel and easy walking
Sport sandal: That can be worn with socks. (Teva, Chaco)
Lightweight hiking boots: Leather or fabric/leather with sturdy mid-sole and a Vibram sole.
Climbing boots: Plastic double boot. Aveolite liners for warmth recommended. (Vasque, Koflach, Scarpa)
Booties: Synthetic or down isulation. Any brand with thick foam soles.
Lightweight socks: Three to four pairs synthetic/wool blend (Bridgedale, Patagonia, Smartwool)
Mid-weight socks: Three to four pairs synthetic/wool blend (Bridgedale, Patagonia, Smartwool)

Clothing:

Lightweight long underwear top: (Patagonia Capilene, REI, Mountain Equipment Co-op)
Mid-weight long underwear tops: Zip-T neck design is good. Light colors are better for tops because they are cooler when hiking in direct sunlight and just as warm as dark colors when worn underneath other layers. (Patagonia, North Face, Mountain Hardwear) 
Lightweight long underwear bottoms: (Patagonia Capilene, REI, Mountain Equipment Co-op)
Mid-weight underwear bottoms: Dark colors are preferable because they do not show dirt. (Patagonia Capilene, REI, Mountain Equipment Co-op)
Briefs: Four pairs synthetic or cotton. Running shorts also work well for underwear. (Patagonia Capilene)
Short-sleeved shirts: Two synthetic; most nylon running shirts or athletic shirts work. (North Face, Patagonia, or any brand of PowerDry)
Jacket, synthetic or fleece: Synthetic jackets or pullovers are a great alternative to fleece because they are lighter and more compressible. Primaloft type fill or Polartec 100 or 200 fleece is recommended. (Wild Things Primaloft, Patagonia Puff Jacket)
Synthetic insulated pants: Primaloft or Polarguard 3D. Full side zips are recommended. Mountain Hardwear Chugach 3D pants are an example. An acceptable alternative are fleece pants Polartec 100 or 200, but they are bulky, heavier and less versatile.
Down insulated jacket: Expedition weight with a hood. (Marmot, North Face, Mountain Hardwear)
Waterproof breathable jacket & pants: Jacket must have a hood, pants must have full-length side zips. (Arc'Teryx, Marmot, Mountain Equipment Co-op)

Head & Hand Gear:

Liner gloves: Lightweight synthetic (Patagonia Capilene or any brand of PowerStretch)
Windstopper fleece gloves: (any brand of Windstopper fleece)
Gore-Tex Mittens w/ pile liners: Expedition weight liner for the first pair, second pair should have a light weight pile liner. (Outdoor Research)
Bandana: Two to three traditional cotton style.
Sun hat: Any lightweight hat with a good brim or visor.
Wool or fleece hat: Any brand of warm hat that can go over ears.
Balaclava: At least one. Some people layer a very thin Capilene balaclava under a thicker fleece one.

Accessories:

Sunglasses #1: For high altitude. 1 pair of high quality 100%UV and 100%IR with a minimum of 80% light reduction, side shields such as those found on “glacier glasses” are not recommended, but size and shape of lens should offer maximum protection from bright light on snow.
Sunglasses #2: One pair high quality 100%UV and 100%IR, for lower elevations, also as a backup. It is important to have a spare pair of sunglasses. 
Ski goggles: (Bolle, Smith)
Gaiters w/reinforced lowers: Short, simple gaiters are best, such as Outdoor Research's Rocky Mountain Low Gaiters.
Headlamp w/spare bulb: (Petzl, Black Diamond)
Spare batteries: For headlamp and other gadgets you bring.

Climbing Equipment:

Ice axe: General mountaineering axe. 60 cm length is good for most people but it does depend on your height. Shaft should be straight, not curved. You will need a leash to attach your axe to you harness as well as a “wrist loop”. Bring a commercial leash designed for glacier travel or 6 ft of 9 / 16 inch webbing and your guide will help you construct one. (Grivel, Black Diamond)
Crampons: 12 point step-in (Grivel, Black Diamond)
Harness: Alpine style, you should not have to step through leg loops to put it on and off. It should be lightweight and fully adjustable. (Black Diamond)
Carabiners: Two large locking “pear” shaped, 6 regular mountaineering carabiners (avoid small gate specialized sport climbing ‘biners) (Black Diamond, Petzl, Clog)
Prussik cord: 20 feet of 6mm perlon which is also known as static accessory cord.(don’t cut it, bring in one piece)
Ascenders: One left or right hand orientation, does not matter (Petzl)
Rappel device: Figure 8, ATC or Trango Pyramid

Camping Gear:

Backpack: 5000 cubic inches (80 liters) or more, internal frame. Top opening mountaineer’s rucksack style is best. Avoid large zipper openings and excessive outside pockets. Larger packs are better than smaller, because they are easier to pack with cold hands and they distribute loads more effectively. (Gregory, North Face, Dana, Arc’Teryx) 
Small day pack: Optional, should be small and simple, can double as stuff sack or organizer, useful for airline carry-on and for while touring in cities. (Black Diamond, Lowe)
Sleeping bag: Expedition quality rated to at least minus 20F (-25C) ((Marmot, North Face, Moonstone)
Sleeping pad: Inflating, full-length (Therm-a-rest)
Foam pad: (Ridgerest)
Water bottles: Two 1-liter, leak-proof wide-mouth. (Nalgene, Lexan)
Lightweight steel thermal bottle: (Zojirushi, Nissan, Outdoor Research)
Pee bottle: One 1-liter, leak-proof wide-mouth (Nalgene, Lexan)
Pee funnel for women: (Freshette)
Pack towel: Small or medium size. Do not bring “terrycloth”, bandanas work in a pinch. (PackTowl)
Trekking poles: Make sure they are adjustable and can extend or shorten. (Leki, Black Diamond)
Swiss army knife: Remember not to leave in carry-on bags for any international or domestic flight.
Large mug, plastic bowl, Lexan fork and spoon: lightweight metal is ok. (MSR)

Medical & Personal:

Sunscreen: SPF 30 or higher, non-oily (Dermatone or Terrapin)
Lipscreen: SPF 30 or higher, any brand
Toiletry kit: toothbrush, toothpaste, lotion, alcohol-based anti-bacterial hand sanitizer, anti-bacterial soap, comb/brush, shave kit, lighter, small long-burning candle, needle/thread, throat lozenges (bring travel size bottles to keep you kit small)
First-aid kit: Ibuprofen/aspirin, assorted band-aids, moleskin, little of hydrogen peroxide, Neosporin-type suave, Nu-skin spray, small gauze pad, roll of adhesive tape, tweezers, safety pins, small bottle of water purification tablets. Include any prescription travel meds that might prescribed by your doctor. (antibiotics, Diamox, sleep aids)
Zip-loc bags: Always useful
Baby wipes
Ear plugs: Very useful in noisy lodges and tents. Available in most hardware stores.
Water purification tablets: Such as Potable Aqua brand iodine tablets. You will be given plenty of purified water during your trek and climb, but one bottle of backup purification tablets is always a good idea for your travels. They are especially useful in hotels on you way to Nepal. You should not drink untreated tap water anywhere in Asia and bottled water in some rare cases might not be available.

Travel Items:

Expedition duffel bag: 8000+ cubic inches (130+ liter). Light colors are better for labeling with your name. Buy something well built with large, strong zippers. These bags are strapped to Yaks! (North Face, Patagonia “Black Hole”, Wild Things “Burro Bag”)
Travel bags: Extra duffel bags are useful for storing things in Kathmandu, in Namche and at Base Camp. Most soft sided “carry-on’ type bags work well. (Camp Trails “Packable”, Wild Things “carry-on”) You might also use extra large stuff sacks. Plan to fly to Nepal with two large duffels, and some smaller bags for organizing inside. 
Nylon stuff sacks: Several different sizes, light colors preferable for labeling. (Outdoor Research)
Long sleeve shirt: Cotton, comfortable
Hiking shorts and/or skirt/sarong: 1 pair (any brand of Supplex short)
Lightweight pants: One pair (any brand Supplex or “stretch woven” pant)
City clothes for Kathmandu and Bangkok: Casual, one or two changes. Kathmandu is warm in the daytime, cool in the evenings. If you stay in Bangkok it is hot and ropical.
Passport belt/pouch
Small padlocks: for locking duffel bag(s)
Book(s)
Journal
Camera / video camera w/ extra batteries: We suggest plenty of non-rechargeable power, such as lithium batteries. Cold weather is hard on ni-cad and regular alkaline batteries and solar recharging is not always an option.
Film: Bring plenty, it is expensive in Nepal. Be sure to keep in your carry-on luggage, in clear zip- lock bags so that it can be inspected at airports. If you bring a digital camera, bring extra media storage cards.

Detailed Itinerary

Feel Free to Contact Us for Detailed Itinerary 

Date & Price

The given rates are per person with guaranteed departure schedules. If the given dates are not appropriate for you, please feel free to contact us for requesting a new dates, we will gladly personalize the itinerary and schedule of the trip that fits for you.

Check our assured departure schedules given bellow:

No dates are available right now. Please request new date.

Avabillity Options

OPEN: This date is available and open for bookings. Go for it!

GUARANTEED: Guaranteed departure. Seat Available.

LIMITED: Guaranteed departure, Limited seat. You can send booking request for availability.

FULL:This date is currently unavailable. Please contact us if you are interested in traveling on this date.

Your Program Duration = 40 Days

All the Prices are in USD Per Person basis.

Service includes

  • Peak permit fee & travel permit
  • Group Chinese visa fee
  • 3 nights hotel accommodation in Kathmandu on BB basis
  • Chinese custom clearances
  • Border transport by private bus/jeep.
  • Jeep to & from Base camp
  • Hotel accommodation in Tibet en route on full board basis
  • Yaks BC-ABC-BC 
  • Liaison officer & Interpreter   
  • One head Sardar/Guide
  • Cooks and kitchen boys.
  • All necessary camping and kitchen gears.
  • Private tent at Base camp & ABC with mattress
  • Group dinning tent & shower tents
  • Storage & communication tent BC/ABC
  • Gas heater for heating purpose
  • Comfortable wooden toilet tent at BC & toilet tent at ABC 
  • All meals & drinks at Base camp and ABC
  • Walkie-talkie set to each member with radio base & accessories.
  • Solar panel or generator for power supply
  • Gammov bag & oxygen with mask set for medical purpose 
  • KTM day tour  
  • Insurance of local team members
  • All airport transport
  • Celebration meal in Kathmandu.

Service does not includes

  • Medical and personal high risk insurance
  • Nepal visa
  • Major meals in Kathmandu.
  • Personal climbing gears.
  • Personal natures expenses.
  • Cost of emergency evacuation.
  • Summit bonus & Tips.

Useful Info

Footwear:

Running shoes: For travel and easy walking
Sport sandal: That can be worn with socks. (Teva, Chaco)
Lightweight hiking boots: Leather or fabric/leather with sturdy mid-sole and a Vibram sole.
Climbing boots: Plastic double boot. Aveolite liners for warmth recommended. (Vasque, Koflach, Scarpa)
Booties: Synthetic or down isulation. Any brand with thick foam soles.
Lightweight socks: Three to four pairs synthetic/wool blend (Bridgedale, Patagonia, Smartwool)
Mid-weight socks: Three to four pairs synthetic/wool blend (Bridgedale, Patagonia, Smartwool)

Clothing:

Lightweight long underwear top: (Patagonia Capilene, REI, Mountain Equipment Co-op)
Mid-weight long underwear tops: Zip-T neck design is good. Light colors are better for tops because they are cooler when hiking in direct sunlight and just as warm as dark colors when worn underneath other layers. (Patagonia, North Face, Mountain Hardwear) 
Lightweight long underwear bottoms: (Patagonia Capilene, REI, Mountain Equipment Co-op)
Mid-weight underwear bottoms: Dark colors are preferable because they do not show dirt. (Patagonia Capilene, REI, Mountain Equipment Co-op)
Briefs: Four pairs synthetic or cotton. Running shorts also work well for underwear. (Patagonia Capilene)
Short-sleeved shirts: Two synthetic; most nylon running shirts or athletic shirts work. (North Face, Patagonia, or any brand of PowerDry)
Jacket, synthetic or fleece: Synthetic jackets or pullovers are a great alternative to fleece because they are lighter and more compressible. Primaloft type fill or Polartec 100 or 200 fleece is recommended. (Wild Things Primaloft, Patagonia Puff Jacket)
Synthetic insulated pants: Primaloft or Polarguard 3D. Full side zips are recommended. Mountain Hardwear Chugach 3D pants are an example. An acceptable alternative are fleece pants Polartec 100 or 200, but they are bulky, heavier and less versatile.
Down insulated jacket: Expedition weight with a hood. (Marmot, North Face, Mountain Hardwear)
Waterproof breathable jacket & pants: Jacket must have a hood, pants must have full-length side zips. (Arc'Teryx, Marmot, Mountain Equipment Co-op)

Head & Hand Gear:

Liner gloves: Lightweight synthetic (Patagonia Capilene or any brand of PowerStretch)
Windstopper fleece gloves: (any brand of Windstopper fleece)
Gore-Tex Mittens w/ pile liners: Expedition weight liner for the first pair, second pair should have a light weight pile liner. (Outdoor Research)
Bandana: Two to three traditional cotton style.
Sun hat: Any lightweight hat with a good brim or visor.
Wool or fleece hat: Any brand of warm hat that can go over ears.
Balaclava: At least one. Some people layer a very thin Capilene balaclava under a thicker fleece one.

Accessories:

Sunglasses #1: For high altitude. 1 pair of high quality 100%UV and 100%IR with a minimum of 80% light reduction, side shields such as those found on “glacier glasses” are not recommended, but size and shape of lens should offer maximum protection from bright light on snow.
Sunglasses #2: One pair high quality 100%UV and 100%IR, for lower elevations, also as a backup. It is important to have a spare pair of sunglasses. 
Ski goggles: (Bolle, Smith)
Gaiters w/reinforced lowers: Short, simple gaiters are best, such as Outdoor Research's Rocky Mountain Low Gaiters.
Headlamp w/spare bulb: (Petzl, Black Diamond)
Spare batteries: For headlamp and other gadgets you bring.

Climbing Equipment:

Ice axe: General mountaineering axe. 60 cm length is good for most people but it does depend on your height. Shaft should be straight, not curved. You will need a leash to attach your axe to you harness as well as a “wrist loop”. Bring a commercial leash designed for glacier travel or 6 ft of 9 / 16 inch webbing and your guide will help you construct one. (Grivel, Black Diamond)
Crampons: 12 point step-in (Grivel, Black Diamond)
Harness: Alpine style, you should not have to step through leg loops to put it on and off. It should be lightweight and fully adjustable. (Black Diamond)
Carabiners: Two large locking “pear” shaped, 6 regular mountaineering carabiners (avoid small gate specialized sport climbing ‘biners) (Black Diamond, Petzl, Clog)
Prussik cord: 20 feet of 6mm perlon which is also known as static accessory cord.(don’t cut it, bring in one piece)
Ascenders: One left or right hand orientation, does not matter (Petzl)
Rappel device: Figure 8, ATC or Trango Pyramid

Camping Gear:

Backpack: 5000 cubic inches (80 liters) or more, internal frame. Top opening mountaineer’s rucksack style is best. Avoid large zipper openings and excessive outside pockets. Larger packs are better than smaller, because they are easier to pack with cold hands and they distribute loads more effectively. (Gregory, North Face, Dana, Arc’Teryx) 
Small day pack: Optional, should be small and simple, can double as stuff sack or organizer, useful for airline carry-on and for while touring in cities. (Black Diamond, Lowe)
Sleeping bag: Expedition quality rated to at least minus 20F (-25C) ((Marmot, North Face, Moonstone)
Sleeping pad: Inflating, full-length (Therm-a-rest)
Foam pad: (Ridgerest)
Water bottles: Two 1-liter, leak-proof wide-mouth. (Nalgene, Lexan)
Lightweight steel thermal bottle: (Zojirushi, Nissan, Outdoor Research)
Pee bottle: One 1-liter, leak-proof wide-mouth (Nalgene, Lexan)
Pee funnel for women: (Freshette)
Pack towel: Small or medium size. Do not bring “terrycloth”, bandanas work in a pinch. (PackTowl)
Trekking poles: Make sure they are adjustable and can extend or shorten. (Leki, Black Diamond)
Swiss army knife: Remember not to leave in carry-on bags for any international or domestic flight.
Large mug, plastic bowl, Lexan fork and spoon: lightweight metal is ok. (MSR)

Medical & Personal:

Sunscreen: SPF 30 or higher, non-oily (Dermatone or Terrapin)
Lipscreen: SPF 30 or higher, any brand
Toiletry kit: toothbrush, toothpaste, lotion, alcohol-based anti-bacterial hand sanitizer, anti-bacterial soap, comb/brush, shave kit, lighter, small long-burning candle, needle/thread, throat lozenges (bring travel size bottles to keep you kit small)
First-aid kit: Ibuprofen/aspirin, assorted band-aids, moleskin, little of hydrogen peroxide, Neosporin-type suave, Nu-skin spray, small gauze pad, roll of adhesive tape, tweezers, safety pins, small bottle of water purification tablets. Include any prescription travel meds that might prescribed by your doctor. (antibiotics, Diamox, sleep aids)
Zip-loc bags: Always useful
Baby wipes
Ear plugs: Very useful in noisy lodges and tents. Available in most hardware stores.
Water purification tablets: Such as Potable Aqua brand iodine tablets. You will be given plenty of purified water during your trek and climb, but one bottle of backup purification tablets is always a good idea for your travels. They are especially useful in hotels on you way to Nepal. You should not drink untreated tap water anywhere in Asia and bottled water in some rare cases might not be available.

Travel Items:

Expedition duffel bag: 8000+ cubic inches (130+ liter). Light colors are better for labeling with your name. Buy something well built with large, strong zippers. These bags are strapped to Yaks! (North Face, Patagonia “Black Hole”, Wild Things “Burro Bag”)
Travel bags: Extra duffel bags are useful for storing things in Kathmandu, in Namche and at Base Camp. Most soft sided “carry-on’ type bags work well. (Camp Trails “Packable”, Wild Things “carry-on”) You might also use extra large stuff sacks. Plan to fly to Nepal with two large duffels, and some smaller bags for organizing inside. 
Nylon stuff sacks: Several different sizes, light colors preferable for labeling. (Outdoor Research)
Long sleeve shirt: Cotton, comfortable
Hiking shorts and/or skirt/sarong: 1 pair (any brand of Supplex short)
Lightweight pants: One pair (any brand Supplex or “stretch woven” pant)
City clothes for Kathmandu and Bangkok: Casual, one or two changes. Kathmandu is warm in the daytime, cool in the evenings. If you stay in Bangkok it is hot and ropical.
Passport belt/pouch
Small padlocks: for locking duffel bag(s)
Book(s)
Journal
Camera / video camera w/ extra batteries: We suggest plenty of non-rechargeable power, such as lithium batteries. Cold weather is hard on ni-cad and regular alkaline batteries and solar recharging is not always an option.
Film: Bring plenty, it is expensive in Nepal. Be sure to keep in your carry-on luggage, in clear zip- lock bags so that it can be inspected at airports. If you bring a digital camera, bring extra media storage cards.

Reviews

No review posted in this trip yet!

Enquiry

(*) required fields